Double Guard Pull Or Standing For Takedowns, One And The Same.

Rafa Mendes and Cobrihna in a double guard pull.

Rafa Mendes and Cobrihna in a double guard pull.

We’ve noticed a lot of hype amongst the jiu jitsu community over double guard pulling and how takedowns should be a factor and implemented more. This created new rules and changed the perception of double guard pulling amongst the jiu jitsu community and federations. Some of the many rule changes come from Five Grappling and the Rickson Gracie Jiu Jitsu Global Federation and include 2 points being awarded to the person that comes up on top for a double guard pull. Also, IBJJF has implemented some rules for the double guard-pull as well involving a 20 second time limit in order to accelerate the pace. The idea is that when 2 people double guard pull they must be working toward a submission or sweep, and if within 20 seconds of the double guard pull there is no action, competitors are stood up. Obviously the issue has been addressed in competitive bjj by the biggest federations and most well run events. Do these rules solve a problem or just change bjj back to matches where competitors stand for a long time or possibly the whole time and win the match 2-0 for one takedown?

Andre Galvao and Ryron Gracie battle for a takedown at Metamoris.

Andre Galvao and Ryron Gracie battle for a takedown at Metamoris.

We think that double guard pull matches and standing for takedown matches are essentially one and the same; the fight is the grip fighting, timing, and trying to get position. Two people can stand for a whole match and one can win off one take down or throw when their grips and position are perfect and get the 2 points, just the same as 2 people can be in a double guard pull or 50/50 position grip fighting and trying to get position and then get one sweep, advantage, or pass and win. So would you rather watch 2 people standing for 10 minutes or sitting?

We recently interviewed Budo Jake, founder of Budo Videos, host of This Week In BJJ and Rolled up, and he said something awesome on the subject. Budo Jake stated “Helio Gracie once fought for over 3 hours! Very few people nowadays would be able to sit through that. Of course we all want to see exciting matches, I just think we have to be careful about losing the essence of the art in favor of “excitement” for the viewers.” We agree with his perception on the evolution of bjj positions like 50/50, double guard pull, and the Copa Podio ban on Worm Guard. We cannot lose the essence of what jiu jitsu is and the artistic aspect in favor of the spectator or excitement. It is still exciting to see a double guard pull because the technique is the same, the competitors fight for grips, timing, and position. There is always exciting moments and movements in fights where the attempts at sweeps and shots are there.  Sometimes when the guys are at such a high level, there is less action or the match is less aggressive because they know so much that it’s difficult to take them down or pass their guard.

Rafa Mendes and Andre Galvao Battle for a takedown.

Rafa Mendes and Andre Galvao Battle for a takedown.

All in all, change in rules and jiu jitsu style in general, shows progression and this is a good thing for all of jiu jitsu! Double Guard pull or standing battle, we think they are the same; it’s all part of competitive grappling. Someone can win off of 1 takedown or 1 advantage, and as we said before change is good. Positions such as worm guard and 50/50 will keep being popularized, along with more new technique as bjj progresses! There are also some great rule changes we’ve seen aside from the ones on double guard pull, such as Five Grappling’s rule on a 6-minute match at black belt. This definitely accelerates the pace and will have more submissions and action, but it’s hard to stop double guard pulls if you have incredible guard players like Keenan Cornelius or a Miyao brother fighting! They have to play their game and see who can win at it!

Written by – Aaron Benzrihem Admin @The Jiu Jitsu

Edited by – Connor Stone Editor @The Jiu Jitsu